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as we near the 1500 mark on the s&p 500. and a 0.1% contraction is expected for the german economy in the fourth quarter. those figures will be out in just under 30 minutes. >>> the governors of the banks of italy -- trade in siena. and imf's christine legarde tells us that central bank stimulus is still needed. >> we have the central bank on the one hand which have done quite a lot, which have been the fireman, in a way. and you have the policymakers on the other hand particularly in the eurozone who have made some progress and need to keep the momentum. >> now, any minute now, we're expecting the results from germany's ifo institute. january business climate index survey is expected to rise to a reading of 103 from 102.4 in december. this, of course, follows an increase in expectations in the dew survey earlier this week. we've seen an increase in the pmi surveys for germany over the last couple of months. as the german economy particularly looking to climb out of its contraction in the fourth quarter, we're waiting on the ifo senior va to tell us whether sentiment broadly speaki
with the u.s. energy revolution, aring if to help us this year on the economy. let's bring in our ace investors, david goldman, former head of income grout at bank of america and michael farr, author of "restoring our american dream, the best investment. abigail doolittle, the investors killed it after hours. >> i think what's going on is an important inflexion point. we had another earnings miss, another guide down. this once superstar amongst the text stock has been falling for a few months. i think traders answered vestors were waiting for this report to see what the future with look like. unfortunately it's not as bright as some might have hoped for and that's now showing up in the stock. >> is there an offset here? google did very well today and revenue was very good. apple versus google consideration apple stop this rally? i don't think so but i want to get your take on this. what does it mean apple is doing badly? is it an apple thing, an economy thing or consumer thing or what? >> i think that's a great question. i think right now i tend to agree with you. i think investors wi
worldwide with the size of that economy including in japan, the united states, china. look at the trade figures worldwide. in 2010 trade grew coming out of the great recession 13.9%, and in 2011 it was 5%, and i think the final figures for last year, 2012, will be somewhere between 2.5 or 2.7. so it's no wonder that you have the problems that you do in major economies worldwide with the slowdown in trade. and i think that unfortunately, i think that we're going to see a continuation of the problems in europe at least for the most part of 2013, just take a look at the latest figures out of germany which was the strongest economy in the eurozone when it came out. and we have our own problems, as you're aware, here in the united states notwithstanding getting by the immediate crisis at the end of this year on the so-called fiscal cliff. all we managed to do was to put off some of the biggest decisions for another two or three months. so i think, you know, europe has managed along with a little help from ourselves and elsewhere has managed to cloud the world economy. in the case of japan, i
to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think one of the challenges will be for him to recognize that the economic instrument in trade is really very important. if you look at asia, the coin of the realm in asia is trade and economics and, you know, if we're going to have a rebalancing toward asia, it needs to be an economics and trade overwhelmingly. so he's got, i think, a real opportunity to help lead the administration in using all of our instruments for national power influence, particularly economic and trade. >> brown: what do you think -- i mean, i know what you think about -- we talked about this in your last book about the need for economic thinking, i guess, changing the way we think about the world. but do you think that the administration has understood that wel
hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against livle wages d woing conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. military has a new order of the day: working up plans for putting women on the front lines. the process was se
the of the bank of israel on keeping his economy strong and safe in a very volatile region. david: microsoft is out. the numbers are out. adam shapiro, how do they look? >> well it's a beat on earnings, david, but a miss on revenue. earnings, 81 cents per share. the street was expecting 75 cents. revenue 21.46 billion. the street was expecting 21.53 billion. jumping in real quick on the press release they're talking about it, in the last quarter, in the server and tools business, saw increase 8.5 billion. the previouser, server and tools business reported 9.1 billion of revenue. 9% increase from the prior period year-over-year. we'll jump in to see how windows 8 is performing but they're missing on revenue. sandra: we'll keep watching the stock here in after-hours trading. looks like it is getting a little bit of a boost in after-hours trading so we'll keep looking at those numbers. keep in mind the revenues numbers fell short but the earnings per share did beat. it is a decent beat. it is six pennies. let's get to the market panel. scott bower in the pits of the cme group in chicago. we hav
about what's happening with the domestic economy. >> yeah. rates probably close to 50% in europe. europe obviously is a collection of smaller companies. if you're historically in those countries you've had to reach out much sooner than american companies have. they're global leaders in their industry around the world. they just happen to be based here in europe and one of our key messages of the last four years has been buy european countries and make sure they have as little exposure as possible. that's generally the message. there's more competition in the market now even from peripheral countries benefiting in the risk rally. >> i wonder about philips, too, reporting tomorrow. are they seen similar to alcoa as the barometer? >> i think, you know, any big company which comes out and meaningfully beats or disappoints the market, european equities are up .25% from the lows in the summer. it could be any number of big stocks which sets the near term direction of the market. overall, it's very unlikely. the corporate sector has within its power to greatly disappoint or please the markets a
at a steady pace since he returned to office last month, retooling the economy, revising foreign policy and reviewing national defense. now he's taken time to pause and sum up his vision for the country. abe spoke before the diet for the first time since his liberal democratic party took power. the prime minister said the economy is his top priority. he noted deflation and the strong yen are shaking japanese people's belief that working hard will bring rewards. >> translator: i will restore a strong economy and unshakable determination. i will press ahead with my three areas of economic policy, bold monetary measures, a fiscal policy and a growth strategy that induces private investment. >> abe urged lawmakers to swiftly pass extra budget bills for the current fiscal year to pay for stimulus measures. he said his spending measures won't go on forever and that he aims to achieve healthy public finances. the prime minister then turned his attention to diplomacy and national security. he said japanese and u.s. leaders should strengthen their alliance to restore the tight bond their countri
.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news for the spanish economy. >>> now in a long-anticipated speech on the future of britain in the european union, prime minister cameron has warned that democratic consent from a u.k. membership is "wafer thin." speaking in london, he said he's in favor of having e.u. referendum but not at the moment and urged e.u. leaders to address the challenges currently alienating the electorate. >> there's a gap between the e.u. and citizens which has grown dramatically in recent years and which represents a lack of democratic accountability and consent that is, yes, felt particularly acutely here in britain. now if we don't address these challenges, the sdarj that europe will -- danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >> i spoke to unilever's paul pohlman to get his thoughts on the strained relationship with the european union and whether a potential u.k. exit is bad for business. >> if you create a certain level of uncertainty between now and 2017 or whatever the date is of a proposed referendum i
to attribute all this do. we'll talk to gouldsby about jumging the economy. i don't know if he's good about -- >> he's been pretty spot on. >> but we're going to hear up some of the party line from him. i saw some of the stuff he says. we're going to find out why we're doing a little better and is whether it's going to continue. let's get the national forecast now. oh, my man is back, the weather channel's reynolds wolf. i told you that the last time. cold weather. >> that's right. >> climate change, snow climate change, no snow, climate change. any variability. and we know about weather over the years, over the millions and billions of years. we know that it never -- the median line is because of all this variability. so it goes like this and then we get to the middle. but now, anything that is not right on that middle average is now seen as, oh, something is happening. >> reynolds is going, what? >> no. he is with me. he knows exactly what i'm saying. every single thing is because of co2 emissions now, reynolds. >> i am just absorbing this. i am just absorbing this. no, we have to talk, m
a greater growth in the u.s. economy i think is still a question mark. >> down europe, up 10% china. okay. china, can be a source of top line growth. latin america could be a source of top line growth. >> and when asked about china, the words for sure, the idea that china is staging a rebound. >> and this is despite the fact that they have terrible fraud there. kind of overlooked it. when you're in that virtuous circle, it doesn't seem to matter what you say that's negative. people want to grasp the positive. it's a different kind of market from what we've had for multiple years. >> and to melissa's point about correlation, it's not that risk on, risk off, which we have dealt with for so long now. every hedge fund would come in, and say, europe's bad today, risk off. >> there are no more excuses for the fund managers who are underperforming the s&p 500. this year could be a good year, a different kind of year from the hedge funds that have done so poorly. >> they're going to have to do actual work. >> right. they will have to show performance now. >> they'll have to go through these quart
. a lot of them have to do with the economy. fix the economy. create jobs. then there's stop spending. and then of course probably the most important that he will talk about tomorrow, compromise, work together. >> chuck todd, thank you very much. >>> let me bring in the rest of our roundtable here. joe scarborough is here from msnbc's "morning joe." adviser to obama 2012, david axelrod. chief foreign correspondent richard engel is here, safe and sound in studio. richard, it's great to see you in person this morning. "new york times" best-selling author of "team of rivals" doris kearns goodwin. in between awards shows she's joined us. and nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw. welcome to all of you. tom, that's where we tee it up. the president, as he begins a second term, very difficult climate in washington and very real expectations. >> yes. and i was looking at those top three priorities for the american people. and they all fit into his single most difficult task, it seems to me, both conceptually and specifically. in the next couple of years, he only has a couple of years, th
water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ >>> we're back. political director and chief white house correspondent chuck todd will take us inside the numbers of the latest poll as you tee up the second term, chuck. >> four years ago, enormous expectations for president obama. there were a lot of people, hope and change was big. this time, call it pragmatic hope as far as the public is concerned. as you see here, just less than 30% believe they're going to evaluate president obama with a clean fresh slate. 64% will evaluate him based on past feelings. and here, a continuation of a trend we saw throughout the first term. very similar to what ronald reagan dealt with dur
in 2014. the moves do follow heavy pressure from shinzo abe despite reflation and a flagging economy. but the yen actually settled higher with some economists. look at that. that is suggesting they ended up almost 1.2% above the dollar. there's questions whether the 2% dollar stated can be achieved. now there's plenty more on the boj's inflation packed with the government live. hi. >> hi, kelly. the bank of japan and the government issued a joint statement that set a 2% inflation target today replacing its current 1% price. from japan's monetary policy has shifted into unexplored territory. the boj agreed to try and hit the 2% target as quickly as possible rather than over the medium to long-term. but the target will probably be difficult to meet. forecasts released by the bank showed that the consumer price index will rise to just 0.9% in the fiscal year starting in 2014. boj officials said that the 2% target will be possible if the country's growth potential is improved by further government reform. the joint statement is binding for both the government and the boj calling on both
of an economy. steams you come there and you obviously things don't always always come through. northbound suggested it's because the adjectives are fun. do you buy that? >> no. i would say the last couple of years, people were pretty negative. i have to say, though i've only been here a day, people are pretty positive this time. a bit more optimistic about what might be happening. i wouldn't say it's time to pop champagne, but people have been more positive this year. >> thank you for being here. joe, becky, back to you guys. we'll see new a little bit. we have a fun segment for you at 6:30. >> you do. i looked through some of the stuff, andrew. you're a regular skier. >> it's a little embarrassing, but we'll show it to you. >> don't give it away. >> but your heel -- >> there it is. >> your heel is not tethers to the ski, right? that's what makes it -- right? >> this is a different type of skiing that i had never done before. >> oh, god. good. >> now you've got the piece. you'll see it. there might be a fall or two involved. >> that's how your hair got messed up yesterday. >>> coming, wha
'll tell what you, if the economy keeps getting better over the next three years, you've got hillary linton rclin running three years from now, we republicans have such a major headwind in our face for the next three years. it's going to be tough. >> yeah, there's no question. but there's so many variables. >> go ahead. >> no, so many variables that could happen in the next 3 1/2 years. >> yeah. ed sees you making a motion, he stops. >> i was trying to get richard haass in on this. >> she wants some more 'roids. >> andrea, i'm sorry, we cut you off. >> no, there are other points about the politics of it. joe biden is going to be at the white house, in closed meetings with the president today and has had a very high-profile role. clearly, this is the interview that he would have wanted to see. and when you talk to a lot of leading democrats who were in town this weekend, they were saying that joe biden has everything going for him except that hillary clinton is a woman and is a celebrity and has the best popularity. and she has the virtue, after eight years then of barack obama and the obama
they were so-called developed economies. and so what i thought i would do here is just run through some of the lessons that we learned there that i think, unfortunately, shut up and looked at by the europeans. and they are only now starting to realize that they could have cut down the present negative situation because let's face it, europe as a whole, with a few exceptions, is in either a recession or stagnation. first, each country is unique. this is something they didn't want to see. greece adding the situation by longtime mismanagement on the fiscal side and raid the banks. in the case of ireland, it was the banks the drag the sovereign is -- sovereign as. in the case of portugal, with some portuguese in the audience here, it was basically a decade of no growth in portugal. in the case of spain, it was a bubble in real estate that was financed by mainly the savings and loan institutions, some of which have gone under, a number have gone under. and a government that basically drove up the deficit, and regional governments because regions are very important in spain, also drove up thi
in equity. the economy is going to be lousy for the next two years. >> so we're running this online poll which is asking this question, this lack of current crisis that we have, is that because there has been real progress or is it century? >> no. i think it's a product. the ecb has stepped up and merkel and others committed to some day doing the kinds of physical transfers of banking units they need. and there has been some real progress even off that cleanup. but none of that is going to offset the unemployment numbers, barred from that the lack of investment, the constraint on demand from the austerity programs, the feedback in europe. so, again, it is real progress, but that's not going translate to growth anytime soon. >> when you say not going to translate into growth, what is the outlook? >> to me, what i've been saying for a few months is that europe's past is bounded from below and from above. we've ruled out the worst of the crisis, thank god. but the austerity, unemployment and continued downward wage pressures put a tight ceiling on growth. so germany is growing less than 11%
in the u.s., in germany and to an extent in the uk. >> the trouble is for all of those economies maybe some of the european ones are under pressure by the government. but the problem is, if you look at issues in the u.s., they're just so low. there's no ability to cut in the long-term. how do you push through entitlement reform and address those issues, especially if there's no market pressure right now? >> my sense is that you don't. i don't understand how that can be achieved and, therefore, i suppose what i struggle with is what solution can the government find? the bank of japan, if you monetize the debt in a low inflationary environment, is this a free lunch? >> right. >> in the uk, it has turned out to be a free lunch. would it in japan? possibly, yes, and, therefore, i wonder if these issues ever will be addressed. >> and what's so interesting, you're seeing these bizarre rates happening in a monetary policy. we feel like we're in a whole new regime where people feel like it doesn't matter at all. wondering if it matters at all how much you spend and borrow in these situations. how d
the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congress. and this is not something that the president can do alone. it is the congress decides how big
of the inaugural address. >> if the president really does care about the economy -- >> it would cancel out the whole long fight to increase auto mileage fuel efficiency standards. >> cheap energy and also a cheap dollar. >> they will fight it. stuart: there you have it. we are out of time. dagen and connell, it is yours. connell: congress set to make a move on the debt ceiling. art laffer is coming up. dagen: playing some defense. the jpmorgan ceo lashing back at critics. more regulation is needed. connell: testifying on the benghazi attack and why moore could not have been done to save americans who died in libya. we will talk about that. dagen: stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole: we are seeing the dow and the s&p hitting five-year highs. we are in quite an environment. nowhere near that 6500 mark where we were for the dow. we have seen a lot of names on the dow doing well today. microsoft, united, disney. we have had earnings season. we are all waiting on the debt ceiling and, obviously, that is something that looms over. google is up 6% now. as we await each one, it certainly can b
and the overall shape and direction of the economy. could you speak to that? >> i for started talking about it two years ago. -- i first started talking about it two years ago. i started talking about what was possible with oil. i was a lone wolf in the woods at the time. since then, the bandwagon has loaded up. a lot of other people are saying, yes, it could happen, and it to be very important for america. particularly as it translates from energy to the general economy. there are more pillars' out there, housing, manufacturing -- they depend on recovery. the one that does not is energy, because the international demand is already there. it has been created by china, india. all around the world. the weakened cash in on that. would not have to wait on it. -- we can cash in on that. we do not have to wait on it. we need to keep doing what we're doing. it is going to mean a tremendous amount of jobs. we have seen that all through the midwest. north dakota is certainly a huge example of it. they say now there is to% and unemployed -- 2% unemployed there. we cannot find those folks. [laughter] we're s
tragedy. how can we keep going higher with the disarray in washington? the general sense that the economy's not getting any better. is it? the answer's simple. why you may not think the overall economy is getting better, you're missing the big picture, partner. if you were to ask me to game the market using just one figure, one figure only, it wouldn't be what apple earnings, the gross domestic product, the growth rate of earnings or the dividend yield of the s&p, it would be the weekly jobless claims. the weekly jobless claims is an indicator of future employment in this country. there's absolutely no coincidence that we had five-year highs today in the stock market. at the same time that unemployment claims hit five-year lows. it isn't fanciful that the market's roaring because jobs are being created at accelerating pace. it's the most determinant of the stock market. after all, the market got crushed when unemployment went above 5.5% and soared right into the great recession. i think these positive numbers are occurring because of the certainty that comes from putting a presidential el
as we think about the economy of the united states coming and as you point out, the other developing countries around the world. one of the efforts of this administration has been to promote business advocacy abroad for domestic businesses at home. i led a trade mission to india about a year and a half ago with a number of businesses from new and church, and they talked about how important it was to have that support from the state officials in india as they were looking to try to establish those business relationships. can you talk about how you might continue that and continue that this is something you would be focused on an unwilling to continue to support? >> well, as i said in my opening, i think foreign policy is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury
of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. lunch." final trades are coming in here in the gold pit and gold futures are holding above the 1650 level. we have openings expiration today and that has kepted to go prices in a pretty tight range between 1550 and 1560 or so. we are also looking at the fact that we are seeing a roll over in the futures market from the february to april contract and that is also where a lot of the volume has been in today's trade. a lot of traders are al
by superstorm sandy. >> dupont 2013, a cautious year with the slow growth world economy. how worrisome are those comments from the economic bellwether. >> j & j exceeds estimates. the full year forecast a bit below the streets, as investors pay close attention to new ceo alex gorsky. >>> the dow component reporting fourth quarter numbers of 38 cents. that was well below estimates. verizon said the results were impacted by superstorm sandy. we're just getting details now, david, on activations on things like the iphone, 6.2 million, not too shabby. >> the problem was not necessarily activations, carl. the key is simply that margins came in even worse than had been anticipated. this, after the company already guided them down a bit at the consumer electronics show a couple of weeks back. and there, of course, you're talking about operating koose i higher than anticipated. investors may be a little concerned today when you take a look at that chart there. now, listen, to carl's point, they're adding a lot of customers. they're activating a lot of devices. we talk often about the subsidy for the app
% of the entire budget of the government. at a time when the world is getting smaller, our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world's comment we face a more global markets at any time in our history. not just in my briefings at the state department, but in my conversations with business leaders and in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, refugee camps, and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i've been reminded of the importance of the work our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy and a dangerous world. i think there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interest. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work closely with this committee. not just because it will be my responsibility, but because i will not be able to do this job effectively without your involvement and your ideas going forward. thank you, mr. chairman and members of the committee. i know there is a lot of ground to cover. >> [inaudible] [indiscernible] >> when i first came to washington and testified,
. that was way before the economy went into freefall, so he had a couple other priorities he had to deal with when he first came into office. and the third thing, erin, is that this president wants this as his legacy. and he has said that he wants it to be a priority, even during the re-electiore-election, he tt this, so he knows that now he has a debt to pay. the republicans need to do this as a necessity, and with all due respect to the congressman, this is absolutely an issue of electoral survival for the republican party. the congressman is right that this isn't the only thing that republicans need to soften up their tone on, but if this isn't something they get done for the latino community, they're not going to listen to them on anything else. >> congressman, here is my problem intellec chatually from where you're coming from. and this is a complicated issue, but i don't understand. these people are already here. you're not going to be able to pick them up and move them out. that's not practical. so if you start from that point of view, how are you ever going to get a deal? >> if i
in on an all-time high. a few seconds from now we get the latest reading on another bright spot in the economy, new home sales coming, the dow is up 40 points, 14865. it is there for almost precisely 300 points away from its record all time closing high. we are on all time high watch on "varney and company" not this friday morning that may be in the very near future. it is friday. here's our friday company. liz macdonald, charles payne, on for -- where is your tie? nicole petallides on the floor of the stock exchange. i have got to go straight to you. what do we have here? i want to talk housing. what have we got? housing numbers in. up, down 7.3% month to month, down 7.3%. up until now housing has been very much a bright spot in this economy but that is new home sales, new homes down 7% month to month on a selling basis. that is what we have got. we have got news on netflix. show me netflix. it is way up again. nicole: take a look at netflix. they have added contents, gave a great outlook. stock is up 8-1/4%, new high again, new 52 week high, you remember when we, last july of 2011 when we we
% of the entire budget of government at a time that the world is getting smaller, that our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world, that we face a more global market than anytime in our history. so not just in my briefings at the state department but in my conversations with business leaders, in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, to refugee camps and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i have been reminded of the importance of the work that our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world and particularly i think there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interests. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work very closely with this committee, mr. chairman and mr. ranking member, not just because it will be my responsibility but because i will not be able to do this job effectively nor will our country get what it needs to out of these initiatives without your involvement and your ideas going forward. so thank you, mr. chairman, and members of the c
and india and we could do significant harm to the u.s. economy i think by putting additional rules and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and ene
. and there's the economy, the jobs which was his focus for the first term. >> yes, and we have the fiscal cliffs. the automatic budget cuts, what to do with the federal budget, so yes a lot of things and then as you mentioned, the economy still underneath everything. that will be a big issue as we move forward this year. >> reporter: one last question, what do you think his legacy will be? >> that will depend on what gets done. i mean, you can give all of the great speeches you want and lay out all of the great plans but if you don't get anything done that will be your legacy. we'll see. i mean, right now, healthcare is certainly his legacy, where the economy goes will depend on how he's viewed in the long- term, too. >> reporter: thank you. nice to see you. appreciate it. you can find a link to jamie's blog at ktvu.com. i just spoke to darrell steinberg, mup in my next report, his special issue he's pushing during his visit and how the nation's capital has a different view of california than it did four years ago. reporting live in washington, d.c., i'm tori campbell, ktvu channel 2 news
the global economy, in large part because one strategist told me it appears japan, or the yen is a reserve currency, the attractiveness there is starting to diminish as people become more optimistic about risk asset. great horizons a great child care company based in watertown, massachusetts. the company was priced at $22 a share. but right now the indication is $25 to $27. 10.1 million shares being very well received by the investment community today. a couple of the stocks we'll be watching today. the earnings parade continues. halliburton opening at a 52-week high after it came in with earnings of 63 cents a share. its international operations helping to offset the weakness in the north american operations. the company also actually said weakness in north america could continue this year -- continue through 2013. but obviously investors like the news on the results. hasbro had a weak fourth quarter. the earnings revenue came in below expectations. the company plans to cut 10% of the work force as a result of the disappointing earnings. there you can see its stock under pressure today. l
't number 2 million. the history of this administration has already been made. but also the economy isn't in a fr fr freefall. it doesn't feel as dire as it did. >> as you mentioned, this is one of these moments. this is one of the symbols that we who love this democracy cherish so much. the president using this opportunity. we talk about the big moments in a presidency. this is one of them. i'm told this is an inaugural address that will be forceful and will be short. this is a president who has had to change in office, perhaps down scale his ambitions on that goal he set out four years ago about changing the culture of washington. that is the unfinished business. but he meets at this hour with the bipartisan congressional leaders of congress. a symbol of bipartisanship when so many americans want to see the reality of bipartisanship. four more years, so the constitution says he gets here, but the political calendar is a lot shorter. he has a finite amount of time to get what he wants to get done done. >> chuck todd is standing by at the white house. our chief political correspondent,
. but obviously he's going to be talking about jobs and the economy. i think in order to do that, he's got to be making us more competitive throughout the world with other countries because you look what's going on in india and china and others and brazil, as an example, and they're eating our lunch. we'll be discussing obviously immigration, which, again, whether it's republican or democrat, they have to get on the band wagon because something has to be done with respect to immigration. and it can be done in a positive way. reducing the debt is a very big thing. i know he'll be talking about guns and some people like that and some people don't. but he'll probably be mentioning that. terrorism is a big thing. you look at it just in watching your show previous to my going on, i'm looking at all that's going on in the world with terrorism and we're not making too much of a dent because it is a mess. they were talking about and our president was talking about how wonderful mali is. mali has been overrun. it's really a big problem, terrorism. so obviously that's going to be high on the agenda
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